The instant messaging platform slack has become speedy and more informal for professionals and employers to find each other.

Slack has become quite popular within organizations as it allows them to communicate with any team member from any place instantly. The app gained popularity during the pandemic and has played a massive role in remote work practices.

Now, aside from Slack being used as a communication server between the company’s employees, most people have started to use slack as a way to connect with other professionals by creating networks.

Networking made job finding easier

Clark Baron said that “it was nuts” how quickly he found a job in marketing after joining the cybersecurity marketing society created by a slack user.

Within a week of joining the society Mr. Baron who resides in Huntsville, Alaska, said that he got 20 calls for an interview and several other introductory conversations with employers.

Among those conversations was with an employee who worked at a cybersecurity company named Nisos; Mr. Baron mentions that he connected with a few other people who worked at the company. After the first conversation with the employee, he said that he got the job the very next week.

“I’m used to either being ghosted or waiting around for about 17 days,” says Mr. Barron, who starts with the Alexandria, Virginia.-based company this week. 

Slack that is owned by Salesforce says that it doesn’t know how many of these groups exist on the platform. After a brief search, they mentioned that they found several marketing groups, including human resources personnel, sales, recruiting, and personnel from other fields.

One group on slack by Blacks in technology says that it has amassed over 8,000 members since it started about seven years ago; the group founder Greg Greenlee said they got roughly 3,000 members in the last two years of the pandemic.

“If you had a person vouching for a company, that will speak a lot louder than a recruiter coming in and just posting a job and saying, ‘We’re looking for diverse talent,’” Mr. Greenlee says.