Amazon has introduced S3 Object Lambda. It is a tool with which access to certain data can be restricted per application without needing to write extra software. The company is also cutting the price of S3 Glacier.

With S3 Object Lambda, developers can more easily split up a dataset for different applications. In a blog post, Amazon writes that there are currently two options for creating different views for different applications from the same data. Either you make copies of the data in which certain data is present, and other data is not and thus each application has its own dataset, or you build a proxy infrastructure for S3 to intercept and process the transmitted data. Both of these options add complexity and cost.

No additional code required

To circumvent this problem, AWS has devised S3 Object Lambda. Object Lambda takes care of filtering the data without the developer having to build anything specifically for it. According to AWS, the functionality works with existing applications based on a standard S3 GET-request, so no further code modification is required.

Amazon mentions a number of use cases that can be simplified with this approach, such as keeping personal data away from analytics or test environments. It is also useful when converting through different data formats, such as from XML to JSON. The tool can also be used, for example, to resize images and add watermarks with information such as who requested the image.

S3 Object Lambda is available immediately in almost all AWS Regions. Some more usage scenarios and advice on incorporating Lambda into your software can be found in Amazon’s blog post.

S3 Glacier price reduction

In other AWS S3 news, Jeff Barr of AWS has announced that the cloud giant will be cutting the price of S3 Glacier significantly. The archival service will be 40 percent cheaper. This specifically concerns PUT and Lifecycle requests for respectively adding S3 data in Glacier and migrating data from one S3 storage class to another. Blocks and Files was unable to find out the exact costs. The base price of 0.004 dollars per gigabyte per month appears to be unchanged.

Tip: Amazon adds improved “Intelligent Tiering” to its storage services