Amazon Web Services (AWS) has published a free multiplatform distribution of the Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK) that is ready for production. The kit is used by thousands of developers to manage their Java-based applications. The distribution of AWS has Amazon Corretto, reports Silicon Angle.

The kit guarantees that Java can be used free of charge by all its users. Java is one of the most popular programming languages in the world and is used in many enterprise applications. However, the future of OpenJDK was endangered because Oracle said to stop supporting the free version in January.

Arun Gupta, principal open-source technologist at Amazon, states that Java is one of the most popular languages among AWS users. In this way, the company wants to continue to provide support. “Many of our customers have started to worry that they had to pay for a long-term supported version of Java to run their workloads. As a first step, we have recently reconfirmed long-term support for Java in Amazon Linux. But our customers and the wider Java community run Java on various platforms, both on and off AWS,” says Gupta.

Support

Amazon Corretto is available on several other Linux versions, including Ubuntu and Red Hat. This happens when it becomes generally available in the first quarter of 2019. Gupta further states that Corretto is made available with long-term support. The company continues to release quarterly performance upgrades and security solutions.

The latest version, Corretto 8, is now available as a preview with functions similar to those in OpenJDK 8. Gupta says that Amazon is running a technology compatibility kit for every future release, to make sure it works with Java SE.

Amazon Corretto 8 is supported until the end of June 2023, and possibly even beyond. Amazon is also working on Corretto 11, which will continue to be supported until August 2024.

This news article was automatically translated from Dutch to give Techzine.eu a head start. All news articles after September 1, 2019 are written in native English and NOT translated. All our background stories are written in native English as well. For more information read our launch article.