MacBooks will run on Apple ARM chips in 2 or 3 years’ time.

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Within a year or two, maybe three, Apple’s MacBooks run on ARM processors. The Apple-based analyst Ming-Chi Kuo expressed this expectation in a new report. Switching to your own chips has a number of advantages for Apple.

According to the AppleInsider site, Kuo, who is generally known as a reliable source around Apple, states in a note that the first MacBooks with an ARM processor should be released no later than 2021. According to Kuo, the chips are produced by TSMC, which will be the sole supplier of the A13 and A14.

Switching to ARM

Kuo expects that the MacBooks will be equipped with the Apple A-series processors for the first time in the course of 2020 or 2021. According to the analyst, this has four advantages. The first of these is that Apple then gains full control over the components of the MacBook. The company already has this for the iPhone and iPad, so the expectation that Apple will eventually switch to this for the MacBook is not surprising.

For Apple, the cost of making a MacBook is reduced as well, as it makes the processors itself. There is a chance that Apple will bring the MacBooks to market more cheaply – although a larger margin is also something that Apple likes – and thus gain a larger market share. In fourth place Kuo expects the MacBooks to distinguish themselves better from the competition.

The fact that Apple will eventually switch to ARM has been in line with expectations for some time now. In the end, the switch will not take place immediately, but will probably be used in the cheaper products and then come later to the more expensive MacBooks. Microsoft did something similar with Windows laptops: in collaboration with HP, for example, it releases laptops with ARM processors.

This news article was automatically translated from Dutch to give Techzine.eu a head start. All news articles after September 1, 2019 are written in native English and NOT translated. All our background stories are written in native English as well. For more information read our launch article.