Increased Git productivity tops the list of new improvements

Microsoft has announced the second preview of Visual Studio 2022 17.1. This release includes new features that align with themes of Visual Studio 2022, such as productivity. 

New Git productivity features will make day-to-day work much easier, according to Microsoft. Developers will now be able to compare the current branch in a repository with other branches. This is useful when preparing for a pull request or before deleting a branch.

Dominic Nahous, Senior Lead Program Manager for Visual Studio, described the release in a blog post. “We’re very excited to announce that 17.1 preview 2 comes with long-awaited Git features to enhance your productivity and make your day-to-day work easier,” he wrote. “Now, it’s easy to compare your current branch with other branches in your repository, which can be very helpful when you’re preparing for a pull request or even before you delete a branch.”

This preview comes with enhanced detached head support, Nahous explains. It also introduces the ability to checkout a commit and checkout the tip of any remote branch. Users can now checkout any commit and go back to a previous point in their repository’s history to run or test their code.

They can also quickly review pull requests and evaluate their team’s updates by checking out the tip of any remote branch.

Improved multi-repo support and a new code cleaning capability

Microsoft has continued improving their multi-repo support preview feature, writes Nahous. They did this by enhancing the inner loop branching experience. Now users can utilize branch pickers on both the status bar and the Git changes tool window to checkout branches and do lightweight branch management across all or your active repositories.

Developers can now keep your code clean, automatically, according to Nahous. “You can now configure personalized Code Cleanup profiles that will automatically run whenever you save a file,” he writes. “This will help minimize stylistic violations within PRs and more by allowing you to spend less time fixing code that doesn’t meet specific standards and more time focusing and being productive.”