Salesforce Einstein Automate helps non-technical users achieve more

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Salesforce rolled out three new products for Einstein Automate cloud offering designed to assist customers regardless of technical background. Einstein Automate was previewed in December, to enable users to create workflows for automating tasks like processing customer requests with minimal or no coding.

The new products add low-code tools to automate time-consuming, manual processes and the ability to integrate data across systems from different operating bases.

The new products include MuleSoft Robotic Process Automation, Einstein Document Reader, and Digital Process Automation. MuleSoft RPA is a new robotic process automation capability that replaces repetitive tasks with bots.

What do bots do?

The MuleSoft bots can intelligently process documents, enter data and take action on behalf of the user, all without code. The capability with MuleSoft RPAs involves bots that work for any system or application, including PDF documents, spreadsheets, and disconnected legacy systems (where applicable).

Einstein Document Reader taps into Einstein’s capabilities to scan documents like driver’s licenses and I-9s, a US employment eligibility verification authorization, and take action on that data with a few clicks within salesforce Flow.

The functionality is said to reduce human error and raise accuracy.

Low- to no-code automation

Digital Process Automation allows users to engage in digital experiences quickly, using drag and drop functions that can define automation rules and logic, extract information from documents and integrate into automated workflows.

The claim is that all of this can be achieved without writing code.

The new capabilities from MuleSoft RPA aren’t the only thing Einstein Automate is sporting, as it also integrates disparate apps and data to Salesforce, using just clicks. The new Einstein Automation features will be in the spotlight at Dreamforce, the company’s annual convention, to be held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, from September 21 to 23.