Microsoft acquires maker of infrastructure assessment platform Movere

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Microsoft has announced that it will take over Movere. Movere is a software developer that sells an infrastructure assessment platform. The platform allows companies to inventory their technological assets, without spending hours on manual work.

The assessments are particularly important for infrastructure teams. By having an up-to-date overview of the servers, applications and users in a business network, administrators can find inefficiencies they wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

In addition, such an overview is a basic requirement for strong cyber security.

Migrate to Azure

Movere is relevant to Microsoft because companies perform infrastructure assessments as part of cloud migration projects, writes Silicon Angle. In this way, companies determine which workloads of their on premise hardware should be moved to the cloud.

Movere makes that task easier for organizations that want to move applications to Azure. The software can map a business network at a speed of over a thousand servers per hour, and then make a visual breakdown of the assets for administrators.

Movere also shows all kinds of related information, such as the use of hardware for business applications and when usage peaks are most common. Such data can be used to calculate how much cloud infrastructure is needed.

jClarity

The announcement of the acquisition follows only weeks after Microsoft announced its acquisition of Java company jClarity. With this acquisition, Microsoft hopes that Java workloads on Azure will run more smoothly.

jClarity offers tools for Java software projects, among other things. For example, the Censum tool makes it possible to identify inefficient parts of software. Illuminate identifies application performance issues.

John Montgomery, Corporate Vice President of Program Management for Developer Tools and Services, said that engineers from jClarity and Microsoft Azure will work together to make Azure a better platform for our Java customers and internal teams. What Microsoft paid for jClarity is unknown.